A Viticultural Paradise

Our vineyards were planted under the advice of top global Viticulturalist, Pedro Parra, in the 1990s identifying the optimum site for production of world-class grapes.

Our most striking vineyard sources, in the Leyda region, are some of the closest to ocean.

At the other extreme, Chile is also home to the world's oldest vines. Here in Itata, we are trialling winemaking with the local Pais variety.

With natural barriers and protection in the form of deserts, mountains and oceans, Chile really is one of the most exciting places to make wine.

 

 

 

(Map - Wines of Chile)

 

Whichever direction you look, Chile’s highly diverse geography and beneficial climate makes Chile a logical choice today’s consumers who demand high quality and ecologically sound practices.

 

Our vineyards were planted under the advice of top global Viticulturalist, Pedro Parra, in the 1990s identifying the optimum site for production of world-class grapes.

 

It is almost a cliché to suggest that Chile is a viticultural paradise but with natural barriers and protection in the form of deserts, mountains and oceans, it really is one of the most exciting places to make wine. Chile’s Mediterranean climate features the warm, dry summers and cold, rainy winters that vines love.

 

Chile’s geographic barriers—the Atacama Desert to the north, the Andes Mountains to the east, the Patagonian ice fields to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west—make Chile a veritable agricultural island.

 

Chile’s climate is highly influenced by the cooling effect of the Pacific Ocean and the Humboldt Current flowing up the western coast of South America producing clouds and fog, but little or no precipitation, which then contributes to making

the Atacama Desert the driest on Earth!  Together they help maintain healthy conditions and protect vineyards against pests and disease.

 

Growing season revels in bright sunny days and temperatures that take a dramatic dip each night to create the broad daily temperature oscillation that wine grapes need to develop fresh fruit flavors, crisp acidity, and in the case of red wines, ripe

tannins, deep color, and high levels of antioxidants and flavonols.

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